Spend five minutes in discussing our treasured game with fellow players, and you’ll hear all the advantages some armies have over others, which units are overpowered, and at least three unit combinations that absolutely punish players on the other side of the board. You’ll also probably hear the words “competitive” and “tourney worthy”.


Funny, those words never seem to appear in Black Library books and codex entries.

Somewhere along the way, the rich lore of Warhammer and Warhammer 40,000 gets shoved in the background to make room for players’ battle plans and their constant pursuit of tabletop superiority. Where one may have been drawn to buy their first box of Eldar Guardians because of their slick armor and saddening fall from grace, now they only pick up kits that counter another player’s flyer.

It’s kind of sad to see a game steeped in well-written narratives become little more than a self-painted first-person shooter. After all, the stories of the northern tribes vying for the favor of their dark gods have probably inspired more players to collect a Warriors of Chaos army than a hot shot bragging about how many wins he’s garnered with his models. So why take the story out of the game?

Playing a themed list, or “fluffy list”, is a great way to live the same kind of stories hobbyists devour in paperback form. Instead of looking at which units are strong and weak, fluffy lists follow what the player actually likes, and just as importantly, what their general would take to the field of battle. With just a small change of perspective, army building becomes a joy instead of a calculation, and all sorts of doors open for collecting, converting, painting, and playing.


Collecting
Look at all this great stuff! Where did you find it?!

Not too many Chaos Lords take Warp Talons in their games, or Mutilators, for that matter. Shame, since these models are probably some of the coolest of the range. So toss out competitive out the window. What does it matter if they’re less-than-game changers if your warlord is an Iron Warrior striving to meld man and machine? Now all of Games Workshop’s amazingly sculpted models are at your disposal, ready to make war to further their goals. And they’ll look awesome in the process.

Tip: It’s usually best to start theming your fluffy army by thinking about your general and his background. Maybe the Empire general is from a land renowned for its expertly-trained swordsman and a history of glorifying Sigmar in all things. Sounds like a great reason to pick up some Greatswords and Flagellants.


Painting 
While battling in the arenas, Maximus always carried a small bag with figurines of his slain family. A small thing became a huge part of his personal narrative
Nothing pulls an army together better than little details. Doing the basics is simple enough; pick a force and paint to match. But it’s the little things that turn a well-painted army into a force full of character, and can be anything the player can imagine. For example, maybe before joining the ranks of the Longbeards, dwarves must earn their place by slaying a goblin with his bare hands and take a piece of their cloak as proof. Paint a patch of their tunic that resemble a black piece of cloth sown in, and behold, the unit how has a story to inspire it to greater heights of ferocity. Or maybe Guardsmen who have served with distinction are awarded relic lasguns plated in gold (coincidentally, this is also great for starting conversations with opponents and other hobbyists). Be inventive!

Tip: There is no wrong way to infuse character into your force. The great thing about this hobby is you can make it your own, so if you can think it up, it’s valid.


Converting
The author’s Alpha Legion Chaos Lord is slowly making his way to Terra, causing him to have many a run in with the Grey Knights. The banner pulls this into the model’s narrative, telling a great story while adding new ways to convert and theme models.
Probably the single greatest thing about theming an army is how much freedom to convert it gives you. Choosing to make a new Dark Angels army into a Guardians of the Covenant force affords its captain the chance to add books and scrolls to models, to exchange backpack vents for flaming braziers, and carve the Imperial Eagle into marines’ foreheads. Creating a Vampire Counts army that feeds solely on werewolf blood opens up numerous sculpting opportunities, such as gifting counts with canine features and replacing ghouls with resurrected man-dogs. One can even go simple and have their Ork army have a particular vendetta with Dark Eldar by piling them atop looted raiders and heaps of agile bodies. All of the sudden, bits boxes become treasure troves of opportunity, and a particular idea is only one Green Stuff sculpt away.

Tip: If you’re not that great working with modeling putty, consider asking friends and fellow gamers about bits that might serve your plans. If your dragon-hunting Tau need lizard cloaks to represent their kill, a Dark Elf corsair cape could be easier than creating one from scratch.


Playing
Like a game of chess, playing a fluffy army isn’t a simple matter. It takes careful thought and a cool head
This is a double-edged sword, and arguably the hardest part of running a fluffy list. On the one hand, the army is full of character and a lot of fun to play, as the story is more important than a win. Unfortunately, it’s also probably lacking a few of the tourney combinations that ensure success. The trick to running a fluffy list is simple; go to have fun. A loss isn’t the worst thing as long as you have fun in the process. Now that isn’t to say that fluffy lists will always lose, but they definitely will need clever tactics to win. Instead of relying on a killer combination, look at your opponent’s side of the board; see what he/she is bringing, and look at the terrain. Most importantly, stick to a game plan. If your army is all about objectives, make sure you don’t get sidetracked by bait targets. If your heart craves slaughter, press the attack while your opponent works to keep objectives from your grasp.

Tip: Deciding which course of action your general would take is a good way to structure your battle plan. A general that loves close assaults can ensure no opposing forces takes a board objective by timing an overwhelming charge. Don’t let your opponent’s army distract you from what your guys do best.


Conclusion
Audiences rarely go to movies to brag about seeing it before their friends, and people rarely read books to boast about how many books they’ve read. Refocusing your hobby endeavors on the story behind the models can infuse the game with newfound life, bringing back all those feeling of excitement that drew you to the game to begin with. Now go forth and write your own story.

Clinton Brad McKay has been rolling dice since first opening up HeroQuest as a boy. He started Warhammer 40,000 in 1998, collecting numerous armies and reading dozens of books. Currently he plays/collects Black Templars and Alpha Legion Chaos Marines, with a Disciples of Caliban ally force waiting in the wings. You can read about his projects and other incoherent rants at his hobby blog, www.nerdstodolist.wordpress.com.

57 Comments:

  1. All of the Characters i take to major tournaments get an individual name. Many are retired afterward, not to be used again.

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    1. Love this idea! May have to steal it from you =)

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    2. more money than sense, it seems...

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    3. @Warboss Stalin
      Is your life so pathetic that the only thing you can do is insult someone over nothing on the internet?

      $20-30 a *major* tournament? That's pretty irrelevant when we spend hundreds of dollars on our armies. And that's "many" not "all." So, like, $20-$60 a year? 6-17 cents a day? People spend more on coffee.
      A mind closed up is like a parachute. Useless. Just spend 3 seconds thinking before you post next time.

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  2. My army has always been about being an effective army. Now I have not always been good at determining what that means, but the narrative has followed the changes.

    My Guard (circa end of 3rd ed) started as a small militia, pulled off their planet by Inquisition forces. They became a near endless supply of troops to be carelessly flung from orbit at the enemies of Man (read: Deep strike doctrine). After years of battle they were pulled from the front lines and the hardened veterans were equipped with Chimeras and Vendetta Gunships, along with a training Cadre of green soldiers herded by a commissar (meltavets+Blob squad w/ commissar). Then suddenly, the Inquisition left them, stranded fighting for survival on their own against Tau, Eldar and Tyranids, their former masters believing that they would surely be destroyed (read: codex GK came out and no more GK allies).

    Finally, when all seemed lost, the company was found by a Rune Priest and his Grey Hunters, and together they strike mighty blows against the Emperor's enemies (read: 6th ed, allies are back!)

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  3. This was a really good read. As for me, I really like making my own chapters of marines. It allows me to do anything I want with them without being counter to the story already written. It is such a big galaxy, so I figured that I'd make something new.

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  4. I am a recent player and collector. I have always wanted to make a Dark Angels army, since I first saw 40k and pictures of them 18 years ago. Events havent allowed me to start collecting until now, and I am enjoying every minute of it. Sure Im reading about units and things that will help me be more successful on the table. The thing is, I am mainly collecting the things that I have always thought were cool or Ive always wanted to collect, like Chaplains and termies. I am now, as I build them and paint them, making a collective story that will tie everything together and I love it. I think its one of the main things that makes this hobby so much fun, the little stories you can come up with for your characters and your units. I feel sorry for the people that are mainly just focused on putting together an army that roflstomps everything on the table without a collective story or something like that.

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  5. Jeah all well & Fine

    But ist comes Down to Money in the end. Fluff Armys just Cost to much, sell Bad on eBay and cost Even more when you try to make them work better.
    If i Build a all ripper nid Army (like i did) i can have some Fun Games Till it Starts to Suck Hard loseing all the
    Time! Then i either invest more Money or stop trying.
    Some Units are just Not Designed to be Fielded in Big Nr. or in a Way that Sticks to the fluff.
    If i want fluff Fun Games i Play a Mission or Szenario!
    Most fluff Armys dont work well. Apart from wadzdaka all ork-Bike Army... Thats Sick as hell to Run 5 huge Units!

    6th ED was Designed to be more fluffy and Balanced but they didnt take into Account that pro-Players will exploit the rules and try to Break the Game.
    They should have rather Designed a comp Game.
    And trying so Hard to sell Flyers was a poor Choice too.

    Game should be Fun Without fluff lists.
    5th did a better Job

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    1. This is why you don't fight people who are using purely competitive lists without an ounce of fluff; they tend to be assholes anyway. GW has never been about making a competitive game, and I honestly find it surprising that there's still such a huge crowd that goes to tournaments, when it defeats the purpose of the game.

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    2. you think people only go to tournis to win? :D
      some times its more fun if both players actually try to play tactical and try to win.

      fluff armys will lose against midiocre best of all world lists... you can´t expect youre oponents to play bad intetionally or BUY, build, paint a fluffy army just so you have a opponent. And even then a ripper army will lose vs a Biker army.
      And like i said their is places for FUN FLUFF games. It should not be youre main Investment in this hobby. And to be real. WHO can afford multiable armys?

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    3. Did you just say that a fun fluff army should not be the main investment in this hobby? Wow. I don't even understand how you think that a competitive army is cheaper than a fluffy one. A fluffy army is you buying things you like, and using them. A competitive army is usually buying the best units for that army, and constantly buying more of them as the strong units change with new dexes.

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    4. no

      its cheaper to add a few bad units to a comp list... than the other way around caus you will need a entire army
      + you wont find that many fluff-players to play againt

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    5. I don't know what you're talking about. Maybe your area only has comp players? When I devise my lists, fluff is the first and foremost consideration. That being said, I still do my best to craft a playable army, as yes, playing an army that is composed of entirely Mandrakes wouldn't be fun despite the fluffy nature. However if you manage to create an army that includes only the units you'd like to play, then it'll last forever, and won't be subject to an ever-changing meta.

      The gaming in my area has a nice mix of competitive players, and people who play for fun. When you use a fluff army against people who play for fun, it doesn't matter whether you win or lose, because the fun comes in having everyone's models, and unique armies, laid down on the table, then crafting a story for the battle.

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    6. Where do you get off telling people how they should build their armies? I know of no rules or mandates as to how one must build up their collections of toy soldiers, other than in a tournament-legal, non-Apoc game they must adhere to the standard Force Organization for that game (unless otherwise specified by the Tournament Organizer). I know plenty of people who buy units simply because they like their looks and/or their fluff, and don't even run them in games, they just like to collect and paint. Where do you get off telling people how they should spend their hard-earned money???

      Troll...

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  6. A very good read. This is basically how I have always approached the hobby. It is always nice to see other people enjoy this style of play and hobby.

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    1. Which makes me wonder why you never come out to play with us Bob. We'll be @ the old HT location tonight starting @6pm.

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    2. Sorry cheef I was in Knoxville yesterday. I will definitely try to make it out next time you guys play. I don't have a vehicle so arranging transportation can be tricky

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  7. Great read. I'm a terrible player, but then I spend too much time painting and reading to be any good. It's still fun though and my armies look great dying :)

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  8. Awesome article! Preach it brother!!!

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  9. My 2 cents on the matter is don't overspend in store. I love GW and this isn't a poke at their business model, but you can be 'encouraged' to buy more than you went in for. Then your painting table fills up, you rush and you do a half-assed job.

    When I invest a lot of time in models, then I add loads of little conversions etc; the story behind them grows itself really and pride in your work makes you view them as an investment rather than a model that represents a bunch of numbers. At least that's my experience.

    Plus, theme armies just look cooler on the tabletop.

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  10. After 15 years of playing Blood Angels, collecting models in fits and starts, particularly when some new competitive combo came out, I decided to start from scratch. I love my Blood Angels codex, but I'm tired of painting red.

    So, I decided to build a Lamenters army. From there, I read any Lamenters fluff I could get my hands on, and really trying to become immersed in their story. Ultimately, I decided that their fleet based nature and less full armory than other chapters, that a drop pod army would be a fluffy choice allowing for lots of painting and modeling opportunities.

    I'm nearly done building everything, and have painted my first test models. I'm excited to say that I think I've built a list that is fluffy (Choosing units based on army fluff, selecting a particular part of their fluff to go with, etc.) but also somewhat competitive (I went 4-1 in the last local tournament). We'll see how it plays into the future, but I really think you can have both...

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  11. I really enjoyed that article. Definitely invite Mr.McKay back again please!

    Makes me feel okay about taking an all hellion force with reavers and razorwings/voidravens. Fast strike, fluffy force with absolutely zero staying power.... probably lose quite a lot but as soon as I read the back ground on those 3/4 units I was hooked on them.

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  12. my future plans involve building a 90% haemonculous coven...once I have funding. Im sure Im going to loose horribly but Im just imagining all the awesome grotesque things Im gonna sculpt for it.

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  13. I'm just tonight finishing up an "all-wolves" Space Wolf List (Thunderwolf Cav, Iron Priests on TW, and Fenrisian Wolves). I take the article on fluffy lists with the image of a wolf about to annihilate a rabbit as an extremely good sign.

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  14. It's nice to see someone advocating the less competitive (but still fun) side of the hobby.

    While I'm a big fan of the Sisters, after over two years of sticking with them consistently I've been looking to branch out, and while tacticas are nice and all to get a feel for the units I think in the end the players should field what they like and find how to make it work best for them. It's how I've been playing for a while now and I actually enjoy it a lot more than getting bent out of shape about the power level of my army.

    Now I just need to pick a new project to branch off into and I'd be set.

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    1. Start an Imperial Guard Army its super fluffy for Sisters and Guard to roll together.

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    2. Honestly I don't care about having two armies that can ally, and the only Guard models that interest me are Vostroyans...

      So yeah, I'm trying to not do a second all metal army this soon.

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  15. Every single one of my Guardsman has his/her name painted on the base and is converted to be original they don't look like catachans or cadians in other words. Each of my tanks & transports are named after Greek Gods. My 2 Vendettas are named Wrath and Fury. A lot of my models have rich backstorys with the Main focus being on my characters. I sometimes feel sad when one of them falls in battle and a lot of people pay out all the names but its a lot of fun. I have a Company Commander named Major Cheeseman who gets a lot of comments. Even if I get crushed most games are a lot of fun which is goal number 1

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    1. Forgot to mention that each has there own ranking as well.

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  16. Hear, hear!

    I win about half of my games with my Word Bearers, but I really don't mind either way - the vast majority of my time in this hobby is spent extensively converting models (to whit, everything but a couple of handfuls of standard CSMs). That's where I derive my pleasure - and then playing an opponent who, much as he might be stomping me into the ground, is also in awe of my models, is a great joy.

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  17. Great read, and I totally agree with you. I have some great friends who are only happy if they're winning, and I've learned a lot of good things from them about what is "effective" on the 40K battlefield. However, while some only have fun when they win, I simply have fun every time I get to play! I prefer running a fluffy, all-comers army than the latest-and-greatest "net list", and I like running funky stuff that people aren't used to facing because it throws them off guard; that don't know what to do! That's not to say that I don't run some "standard" or needed units, but I'd much rather face a fun, fluffy army than one that's tooled specifically to win at all costs, so that's what I try to bring to the tabletop for my opponents to face.

    Don't get me wrong; I like to win as much as the next guy. But a bad day of gaming beats a good day of work everytime, so anytime I get to play a game of 40K is a good day, regardless of the outcome.

    Also, I try to make sure that I learn something from every loss, so that I can constantly improve as a player, because I think that makes it more fun for future players, to be presented with a challenge instead of facing the same old thing every game.

    Thanks for the article. I especially liked the "Tips" at the end of each section. Nice touch! Write more, please!...

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  18. Thanks, everyone! Glad you liked the piece. This is a subject close to my hobbyist heart. It was the stories that drew me into this hobby, and the stories I create that keep me going. All my units and characters get names and a background story. Every game I play gets a story about it afterwards, even if it's just in my head. I can understand the desire to win, but to me, it's about the narrative. Just thought I'd share.

    Again, thanks, and keep those dice (and stories) rolling!

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    1. I concur with this. In the Space Wolf army I'm working on at the moment every single model will have a name and a some background written for it.

      It's hard work, but in the end you feel much more affection for each model.

      Just giving them names adds so much to the narrative. The very fact that Barungr Half-said is shooting his assault cannon has so much more resonance than 'my Wolf Guard terminator with assault cannon is shooting'.

      Good article; it's nice to hear this sort of thing these days.

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  19. Thanks very much for this article, honestly it has cheered me up on a dreary Saturday morning in Berkshire. These days I myself only play games against a few friends because I was tired of power gamers. What I love about this hobby is the beautiful scope of these great worlds. There are four people I will still play against, and all of them have come to understand that the tabletop game is simply an extension of a story set in one of these worlds. And once everyone in a gaming group takes this on board, you end up having some great games with people who love Warhammer rather than winning. Thanks again.

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  20. My Nurgle brigade fluff is centered around revenge for Draigo giving our Morty his heart tattoo. If I ever play against a Gk army with him in it, the only tactic on my mind is locking every gun on to him till the ghet is done! All other games are just cutting a path towards him and collecting research, artifacts etc.. for the ultimate goal of one day making him bend his knee to Mortorian and Nurgle. Yes Draigo, we are coming for you!

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    1. Cool back story may the gods bless your endeavour.

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    2. lol! I'm terribly sorry, but after one glorious day in battle (though ultimately I lost the game), my Storm Wardens Captain is now permanently named: 'Captain I killed Draigo'.

      Thus my apologies for already expunging that monster from the galaxy...

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  21. Great article with some great ideas. However, I would say that also remember it's a mixture of strategy game and story. That might sound silly to say but I would look at carefully what type of units you enjoy playing with as well as the fluff. E.g. Do you like slow, tough advancing forces? Plucky defenders with lots of guns? Lightning quick glass cannons? Or a combined force with elements of everything? This isn't about power levels, this is just about what kind of game you like to play. For instance I like assault and mobility (sometimes with firepower instead of assault) so consequently I've got a CSM Khorne Bezerker army, an Eldar force with wave serpents and vypers and have started a dark eldar wyche/venom army. After selecting the kind of game I like to play and the models I like, I then set to work on the fluff, love, care and attention......something the wife is not always happy with...;)

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  22. great read =)

    I like the idea of characters retiring ... my Vendetta changes with game, for every major kill it receives a another kill marker on the side. For every time it got shot down, I'm adding another scratch...

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  23. This is a fantastic article, and one that really needs to reach more people. Luckily where I live, there's an abundance of fluffy/hobbyist games. Unfortunately where one of my friends lives, everyone is a bandwagoner and competitive to the core.

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  24. Outstanding article about a topic near and dear to my heart! I am definitely one of the fluff bunnies, and some of my more competitive friends are often bemused by my choice of units and equipment. But we bunnies like what we like! 40K is arguably the best science fiction out there, and it's a shame not to utilize some of that amazing story in the game.

    "Why are you giving that scourge solarite a power lance? He doesn't have hit and run."

    "Because it looks cool!"

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  25. To me, fluff is first and foremost. However, I do my best to make the list work. For the last while I have been refining my Thousand Sons and Daemons of Tzeentch lists and army. I have many different combinations with my limited unit choices, but I surprisingly have found ways to mix it up and keep it fresh while still maintaining my fluff. I even do well against Orks.
    But, I don't care if I lose. I have put so much thought into my models and their background that I just like to see them on the battle field. And no matter how much I lose, the battles are hard fought and often incredibly close.
    The core of my Thousand Sons armies are generally:
    Tz Lord ML3 w/ Sigil
    2-4x 4+Sorc w/ Stave and Meltabombs in Rhino with Havoc
    2x 20 Cultists
    2 Vindicators
    Heldrake w/ Bale
    Then I mix it up from there. One list variation has 9 Sorcerers, but that's a larger list and 2-3 are Obliterators that are modelled as Sorcerers in Termie armour. A couple lists even feature Fabius Bile and a large squad of "domesticated" Wolf Brothers that act as servants/body guards/lap dogs to my Sorcerers. 20 cultists are Sorcerer Thralls and the other 20 are Tzaangors (Tzeentch Beastmen that populate the Planet of Sorcerers).
    I think I am the only person that believes in the Thousand Sons haha. But, my fluff runs deep and I am satiated. Every character is named including their wargear and various titles. My high ranking daemons even have true and use names.
    I just can't go unfluffy for power, though. I won't mix Nurgle into my army or really anything else. My Wolf Brothers have the mark of Slaanesh, but that is more just to show how they are feral (fast like wolves) and enchanted (FNP from the icon). I'm still debating if I should use Khorne instead, but I actually really like the idea of paying for the more expensive mark/icon and then just roll for which set I have at the start of the battle. My group has okayed it, but I have never done it yet. They only make my lists once in a blue moon anyway. They are more for fun if I will be facing Space Wolves (a sort of "In your face pups of Fenris! Your brothers are my bitches!").

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    1. You shouldn't be afraid to toss Nurgle marked things into your army. A thing I have been toying with (theoretically, as I don't have the models/conversion skills) is running a mono-god army, but with all the different marks in use. My fluff explanation - in a Tzeentch way for example - would be that their increased toughness is due to the sorcerous energies that envelop them.

      Just my two cents.

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    2. Well, I have a Death Guard army as well, so I just keep them seperate :)

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  26. Hear-Hear!!! I have no interest in building a "competitive" list, nor in playing "competitive" players, though I have, and guess what? My fluffy army has beaten them. Not bragging, just saying that if folks are only playing the game for the math calculations they should get jobs as accountants. if you're playing a game with as much rich fiction and mythos as these simply to prove your mathematical skills you're playing for the wrong reasons. To me a "competitive" player/list is the equivalent of playing Mortal Kombat or Street Fighter against someone who uses the same kick over and over again -- they might win that way but it sure ain't any fun to play with or against. Hobbies like these should be for having fun and making your own stories, not for bragging rights.

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    1. I have to respectfully disagree with your last sentence, J.D. I have plenty of friends who run armies that are both competitive and fluffy, and they play competitively for 1) bragging rights, and/or 2) prize support. "Hobbies like these" should, IMHO, be for whatever brings satisfaction to the participant. You aren't forced to play in tournaments, but some people thrive on it and have built up respectable reputations and status as frequent winners. Personally, I've stopped playing competitively, and there are plenty of "mostly" competitive players that I don't play against in "friendly" games, because they are too competitive for my tastes and it isn't enjoyable for me to play against them.

      On the other hand, there is a core group of top-tier players that I intentionally seek out to play games with so that I can improve as a player, by playing (and generally losing to) players who are better than I am. Most of them have beautifully painted armies and a good amount of fluff "baked in to" their lists.

      So, I wouldn't go so far as to say that our hobby is or isn't suited to one style of player over another. It is appealing to different people for different reasons. Personally, I like "forging a narrative" with my army and my regular gaming buddies, but I wouldn't deny someone who plays competitively on a regular basis of their well-deserved "bragging rights" for their tournament record...

      But, that's just me. I want everyone to have a good time with the hobby, regardless of their motivations or preferences...

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    2. Agree with this. The hobby is and should always be a broad church, room for everybody. Personally, I'm in it for the modeling, the painting and the gaming, really don't care much for the fluff. But that's just me. It's not the right way, it's not the wrong way, it's just my way.

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    3. You're right, everyone should get out of it what they want. if they enjoy that style of play and play with others who do, of course that's their choice, they should do what they like.
      Personally, when i see folks blogging their latest list that's just spam after spam of the same blah units over and over again... to me, there's no flavor there, like eating wood chips or stones. but to each his own.

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  27. Seconded, but for one thing: Mutilators, cool models?! Seriously?! They are a very lackluster, obvious conversion of the oblit models (which aren't as terrible as people say they are). Seriously, a few hours work with a bit of greenstuff and a random terminator kit would make for much better models than these poor excuses for new releases. Whoever gave the green light for producing this kit was not in their right mind.

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  28. This article was a great read, from one DE general still without a win under 6th edition it doesn't really matter, I've had great fun in the games I've played and I've learnt a lot as well.

    Incidentally my Dark Eldar background is written on the basis of an archon who's recently taken of a kabal, and his sister is a succubus who provides the wyches/reavers etc for his armies. Consequently they're both still finding their feet so to speak, but have grand plans for universal domination. In fact, I'm fairly certain they'll come to blows at some point...

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  31. Excellent article. The reason I started to collect Tau (my first and only 40K army) was their fluff, how they were the only non-psychopathic society in the game.

    My army is a very small elite force lead by a scholar, Shas'o Bork'an Vash'ya, a true follower of Commander Puretide, that defends versatility and balance. Therefore, my army always follow some rules: a) all units must have black sun filters, in order to adapt to night fighting, b) all units must have Targetting Computers when available to represent that every single individual in the army is a veteran (often rejecting the chance to be promoted to Shas'el to have the honor of serving in my Commander's force), c) all units must use jetpacks or a Devilfish transport, d) no Crisis unit can have duplicated weapon loadouts, and e) every FOC section must have the same number of units to ensure maximum flexibility. Therefore, my commander doesn't field Broadsides, Kroot, allies and many other specialized forces.

    I love my fluffy approach to gaming and I know my army inside out, so it's quite effective at the same time!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I used to play for fluff. I played a little army called Undead. Von Carsteins hated Nagash and wished to make an empire of the dead... Than they got retconned to 2 different armies.

    I used to have a Chaos army, of fallen Ogers who wprshipped the dark Gods. Changed by a slaughtermaster who cursed himself into a shaggoth to lead his people, he exchanged the souls of gnoblars and humans for beastmen. He would summon daemons for larger battles Than retconned.

    Fluff only matter when fluff doesn't change. GW changes to sell.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did i mention the Chaos ogres had mercenary ogres in it too.

      And My first adventure into 40k Army wise was a little thing i call Sisters of Battle. Nuns with Guns who helped train stormstrropers and Order Arbites. LULLLLL

      Delete
    2. That sucks. And if/when they do the same to Tau, I'll just quit. There are many other games out there that treat their customers with respect. Actually, I'm now playing X-Wing way more than 40K, so quitting won't hurt that much.

      Delete

 
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