With the new Chaos Daemon codex very much out now, I thought one of the first topics to hit, was the randomness of the Warp Storm Tables. Normally I am one that is against randomness and charts, but this one...... in particular I really enjoy. (and its not from a ha ha, look at what you got perspective.)


The Table itself is rolled on every turn if your primary detachment is Chaos Daemons. This gives a great visual of a literal warpstorm on the battlefield. While the visual theatrics I really like, it really comes down to how the rules on the table are handled. (Imagine how much chaos two Daemon players will have, as each shooting phase a new warpstorm result is rolled)

There is also a Warlord trait to get a re-roll on these tables.

Warp Storm results are rolled on a 2d6. The only real negative ones are the following numbers 2,3, and 4. So your chances of getting a real negative effect are small.

The numbers 5,6,8,and 9 very much effect your enemy more than you, most often with every enemy unit rolling a d6, and a 6 getting hit with something and taking damage. Each number also has the chance to hurt daemons of a particular chaos god. So really a majority of them are all good for Daemon players, and if your army is mostly of one chaos god or another, your chances of taking hits are minimal.

Perhaps this was to a slight push towards armies going strictly to one god or another. Either way, it falls into the fluff nicely, and I look forward to seeing it play out on the tabletop.

5: Storm of Fire. Nurgle units and Enemy: On a 6 place a large blast S4 AP5 Barrage and Ignores cover
6: Rot, Glorious Rot: Tzeentch units and Enemy: On a 6 suffer d6 S4 AP3 hits poisoned 4+ ignores cover
8: The Dark Prince Thirsts: Khorne and Enemy: On a 6 suffer d6 S6 AP- hits rending, ignores cover
9: Khornes Wrath: Slaanesh and Enemy: On a 6 small blast S8 AP3 hits, Barrage


38 Comments:

  1. Why does khorne and slaneesh suddenly hate each other and tzeentch and nurgle as well. it was always khorne vs tzeench and nurgle vs slaneesh in the old fluff why change it now?

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    1. It's been this way since the realms of chaos books.

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    2. You are incorrect Aaron. It has been this way for more than 10 years now.

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    3. I know khorne hates slaneesh because alpha males hate emo kids.

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    4. Common mistake I'm afraid, Aaron. Whilst Khorne dislikes magic, he has no great rivalry against Tzeentch. It's actually more subtle than that, which I really like: Khorne despises Slaanesh, who he sees as dishonorable in combat (in conflict with his own martial pride). Tzeentch and Nurgle come into conflict over their broader philosophies: Tzeentch sees the progress of time as a mechanism of change and hope, whereas Nurgle sees stagnation and despair - as such, their viewpoints are fundamentally incompatible.

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    5. Khorne is the embodiment of Death
      Slaneesh is the embodiment of Life (in all it's chaosy forms)
      Tzeentch is the embodiment of change
      Nurgle is the embodiment of stagnation

      So - death hates life, life hates death, change hates stagnation, and stagnation hates change.

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    6. Prior to the birth of Slaanesh, Nurgel and Khorne worked together to beat up on the Changer of Ways, but Khorne, the eldest god, went to put the new one in it's place. So far as I understand. But Mr. Burn is also very correct. The battle between Tzeentch and Nurgel are, at their core, the battle between progress/complexity Vs. Entropy/decay.

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    7. I stand corrected. This is actually good fluff and where I was thinking it was weird and distorted its actually very sound. Thanks everyone :)

      I love Chaos again

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    8. Khorne is about sadism, while Slaanesh is about masochism. Tzeentch is about evolution, while Nurgle is about entropy. :-)

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    9. I think the confusion might stem from when Slaanesh imprisoned that Eldar god lady and Nurgle "rescued" her. I know it did me and thought Slaanesh was the enemy of Nurgle after also.
      There is some fluff somewhere also about Nurgle being a bit more complex than just wanting stuff to decay. He likes seeing new life grow from the decay as with the plants in his Garden in a Circle of life type thing.

      Also When nurgles power is at its greatest the boundaries of his realm grow and spill out into the other realms. Tzeentch has to fight to cut the garden back and Nugle hates that because he is killing that new life. I think the animosity is more to do with being a couple of angry neighbors toward each other.

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  2. This sounds like a lot of fun! I really like the randomness of the new Daemons. The old ones seemed way too predictable for warp spawned creatures.

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  3. I think the table is pretty solid. Yeah there are 3 bad rolls (the -1 to the invuln really hurts) but the other 2 arent too detrimental. On the other side of the things the herald spawning is freaking amazing and pretty game breaking. the invuln bonus is nice and the ability to spawn a new scoring unit of our choice is rocking. I think its more of a boon than anything. So it gets to stay for me.

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    1. I'll bet you'll change your mind after a game or two.

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    2. The other two negative rolls are pretty extremely bad, actually. None of the good rolls are as good for you as the bad rolls hurt you, and the bonus unit gives away kill points - automatically even, if you don't have models to represent them. And the middle rolls? not that much of an impact, but a lot of rolling and a major delay & interruption to the flow of the game. All in all, the chart doesn't feel worth the bother. To me, anyway.

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    3. Don'f forget you can reroll results with some options, negating the bad rolls further.

      I see this table as more of a free shot against enemies every time it is activated as like say bad roles can be negated pretty easily.

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  4. with the musician rules, the most self-fuckery resistant army is on made up of equal parts from two gods that hate each other. heh.

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    1. Yeah... But you do it at the cost of dying inside for going so far against the fundamental fluff! :P

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  5. Why do people complain when there's a chance of something bad happening? For one, it's a small chance, and two, they can't just make it all good things. That's a little too OP. This way, there's a risk vs. reward, with some ways to mitigate the risks.

    A smart, tactical player won't be harmed by any of the rolls, really.

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    1. Eh? Tactics give you board control. Random events don't. Over powered? Hardly, most results are detrimental.

      It's just randomness for randomness sake. Hell, there's already daemonic ruddy instability - here, take an army that destroys itself when it loses a combat which you're not very good in really - oh, and just for fun, we've lowered your leadership values to make this more likely.

      Hell, Necrons removed the phase out, seems Daemons got it back.

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    2. Heh, marines don't get negatives on their random options, just chaos... For no points drop. It just doesn't add up...

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    3. @Pegobard: I actually love the random rules in the book. It really helps reinforce the idea of "Chaos". And saying "most results are harmful" is a bit silly since the middle ones effects the enemy MUCH worse and has 4 times the chance to happen (since there are 4 results that effect the entire enemy army and in turn effects only one god). People just need to relax and have fun with the game.

      I have the codex and have gone through the whole thing and I think they did a fantastic job with the book. I really like that Kelly and Co. have re-introduced the demonic rivalries with fun rules that support that idea. Something that I have been missing since 3rd ed. If the books keep going like this and the different armies get updated fairly quickly this will be by far the best edition 40k has seen.

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  6. Sweet i love a mechanic that adds 40+mins onto every game.

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    1. haha! If it took four whole minutes and the game was ten turns long...

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    2. Ha. 40 mins really?... Personally my gaming group has found 6th edition games pretty quick. Much faster than 5th. Wound allocation biggest difference i think. New codex is very interesting after my first glance. Personally i love the randomness and it has added some much needed spice and character to the daemon army. Bigger overhaul than i expected but am excited about the options and challenge it poses.

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  7. So roll 2d6, look up a chart, roll another dice and then resolve the effects... and forget wat turn it is, whose turn it is...

    Or ignore it completely and move along. Hell's bells. I know 40K isn't chess but does it really have to be one endless random event? My gaming group will likely ignore this, just as we ignore the all champions have to challenge lark. It's just hassle.

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    1. lol If rolling two dice, working out the result, then one more dice and working out the result causes your group to forget whose turn it is then I think you guys need to be in a hospital or retirement home instead of a gaming group...

      :S

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    2. Yes Mauler! Why are people thinking this is going to be so hard? Most results probably won't amount to much anyway as it is.
      I can understand ignoring the marine challenge issue, it's unfluffy for a few legions/groups who'd rather pull a Sindri (Dawn of War 1)

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  8. If you take fateweaver as your warlord you can guarantee the re-roll warp storm trait. Furthermore you can use his re-roll one die per turn ability to make sure you consistently roll something that is really bad for your opponent.

    Just stand back and watch the opposition psyker's heads explode and spawn new daemons with 11's and 12's!

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    1. You know that doesn't sound too bad a tactic! :P

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    2. As a mono-Tzeentch guy I'm seeing this as the only way of dealing with eldar and runes of warding...

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    3. Don't instruments help also to negate the bad rolls?

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    4. That would be great!

      What do musicians do exactly?

      I pre-ordered a Tzeentch limited edition codex... Needless to say it hasn't arrived yet...sigh!

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  10. The three 'bad' roles are each significantly worse for you than the three 'good' roles, and the four roles that damage the enemy (and potentially you as well, god depending) in between each amount to a ton of extra rolling.

    Because the main problem with 6e was apparently that the games played way too quickly, so it's a great thing that the daemon book adds essentially a whole extra player phase worth of rolling and resolution each turn. /sarcasm.

    Regardless of your feeling about how 'good' or 'bad' the chart is for the daemon player, I really can't see how the effects are worth the considerable hassle and delay of game.

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  11. * significantly worse for you than the good rolls are good for you

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  12. Who says responding to random events is not part of tactics? In real battles, the generals do not have omniscient powers to see all that is and all that will be. Unexpected things happen and they deal with it. Having nothing random is playing chess, or in this case, playing listhammer. People want to know they won because they picked the beardy army that their opponent didn't happen to take the one counter to. It seems to me a lot of people want to spend several hours playing out a battle whose outcome was determined the day before picking lists.
    Why not just get rid of all dice rolls and calculate the average for each units attacks. Why roll to hit, wound, and save? Its 3 rolls that could have just been determined by one, or could just be replaced by an average and play the game a lot quicker. Just write a computer program that calculates your odds and tells you who won and don't bother playing the game.
    40k players would make terrible real life generals. "This random weather is so UNFAIR!"

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  13. I really don't see the problem. the first one is a pair of ones on 2d6, and that's what, a 1/36. then you have the next one that is 1/18, and the last one is 1/12 (if my math is right) So that makes it, all together, a 1/6 chance of something totally unpleasant happening. then you take into account that that two of the options only have a chance of sucking (again, if my math is correct..it is 2:30am for me) one being a 1/36 per unit and the other being a more unfavourable 1/6 for a single random character.

    then you have the four that make up for lack of range that have variables. the easiest is to play either single god and worry about one, or you go antifluff and do the hatred matchup.
    On the other end of the spectrum, you get the same odds.
    Add in things like warp tether, lord of unreality or immortal commander or some of the named characters things(looking at you kairos) and you really can build around the bad stuff if it bugs you that much.

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