Last week we were talking about the delay between digital supplement releases, and the hardcover version. The Tau Farsight Enclave is not supposed to hit hardcover until October, and there are many reasons for this. This should clarify some of the confusion.


Previous post on the same subject as part of the same discussion. (also printed out below)
http://natfka.blogspot.com/2013/07/farsight-between-digital-to-hardcover.html

via an anonymous source on Faeit 212
GW uses a third party printing company. They are bringing on board a second printing company to do soft covers. They don't want different companies doing the same book or even the same type of book for consistency purposes.

There is a backlog (not to say they're behind), but to say that there is a printing priority and sourcebooks don't bump out codexes.

Instead, during a lull multiple sourcebooks will get printed since they're done in lower quantities.

Some of these will be catch up, some right on schedule and some Pre-printed for later release.

There's no intention on digital only sourcebooks, it's just a desire to release farsight now despite the book not having been printed yet.

It also means if any first day changes get made, the printed version will include the revisions.


Previous comments
via a solid anonymous source on Faeit 212
As for the delay between digital and print:

It's to due with a physical production backlog.  The current printers used can't actually keep up with the volume of production needed.

Codexes take precedence over sourcebooks.  The idea existed to simply wait on sourcebooks, but realistically there's no gap large enough between top tier releases (army books) to squeeze them in.

Instead, the Digital model helps in two ways.  First, it lets people who want it get it as soon as it's ready.  Second, it let's GW coordinate the releases a lot more smoothly until a second printer is acquired (as is the case with the softcover books, they will be coming from a new printer).  Third, it alleviates some of the production stress since people are less likely to buy a hard copy for something they have a digital copy of.

The idea of cross-platform, cross-media production of the same book is not a money grab.  GW of course doesn't mind if you buy the interactive book, the ebook and the hardcover, but it's not the goal.  The goal (much like the LEs) is to provide "something for everyone," no matter what your taste is.

So the Digital will come out when it's ready or when it's timed properly, and hopefully the print will line up, but Supplements aren't about to bump codexes behind since that would upset more people than it would please.

In the future, expect the releases to be a lot closer to one another and eventually sync up within a week.

39 Comments:

  1. You know what the great thing about the new digital copies is? Transparency. Itunes and the App store allow users to post feedback, and on these supplements, that feedback has been highly negative, highlighting the rules issues, mistakes, errors, and the fact that the price of these just isn't worth what you get. I think that kind of transparency could really effect GW's future decisions, knowing that their products will be scrutinized and reviewed where anyone making a purchase can read them.

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    1. The problem with Internet reviews is that 80% of Internet posters is they are overly negative. It's the nature of the beast. They sit at their computer bitching and gripping about the littlest detail. I stopped reading warseer, blos and now shying away from dakkadakka due to the huge about of rage fan boys.

      Also the digital books is exactly what people wanted and begged cried for years ago. Now they have it and they have moved on to bitch about something else.

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    2. Yes when people asked for digital rules, they screamed: "BLIZZARD WE WANT DIGITAL RULES, AFTER A MASSIVE PRICE HIKE WHICH THEN MATCHES DIGITAL PRICING"

      Not that long ago a codex was $30AUD, now it is $83 with digital prices to match.

      Also you sound strangely like a GWS fanboi. I've yet to really see a rager without a few valid points, unlike the people who wouldn't see GWS doing evil if the codexes were released in babyskin paper using blood and bodily fluids as ink.

      If anything there are more foaming at the mouth retards supporting GWS for no reason on those sites than anything.

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    3. I know that Blizzard have basically created a whole career off of GW's back but...actually I think that's a typo :P

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    4. As a Tau player, I'd say the Farsight supplement is more than worth the cost. The background was interesting and well written, the artwork was fantastic, the general feel of the rules is good, and the scenarios at the end look really interesting.

      The only real problem with it is the wording of the rules, though 90% of that comes down to the issue that this is the first time a codex has been able to ally with itself.

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  2. Latest GW activities;

    Speed up Codex production
    Provide cross-platform Codex & supplements
    Provide Supplements
    Update model ranges

    I for one have got to say: Goodjob GW, well done

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    1. All those things seemed to happen when they got rid of Mark Wells, maybe he didn't like this direction..

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    2. Now if only they could work on those prices a bit...

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    3. Let's not get too crazy here lol

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    4. They'll lower the prices when there's a real demand for that. PP's prices are equally absurd, and GW's sales have been steadily up in volume since 6th dropped. If the prices lowered, that could be a bad sign. This is a niche market, so the Wal Mart method of throat cutting would never take off here.

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    5. It's not the prices keeping new players away.

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    6. It often is. I have many friends who are very interested in the setting, but never take the plunge in buying models, because of just how expensive they are.

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    7. "It's not the prices keeping new players away."

      Really? Than what is?

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    8. But I agree, GW is really is doing a lot of things right and creating a lot of enthusiasm around the game. Needless to say I'm dying for the new Nid dex and supplements. Granted, Nids are doing great right now, but that's on the backs of a handful of units while many units are nigh useless.

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  3. Actually PP's prices may be similar to GW's, but the difference is that PP's games require FAR FEWER miniatures than GW. GW has recently replaced codex creep with price-gouging on points values, prompting players to buy MORE of the models they need to be able to run a viable army. Back in 3rd or 4th edition something as ludicrously huge as a WraithKnight would've cost 400+ points, and now it's a mere 250 (or something, I don't play Eldar). Point being that while most people will only take one due to the price of the actual model, the unit itself barely pads out your list like a big centerpiece used to.

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    1. Actually,the wraithknight can go up to like 350-360 depending on options iirc. I think the trend though is to keep them barebones simply because ivesting that much of your list in one model is comparatively riskier.

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    2. The model count on PP games has been steadily invreasing over the years, just like GW did....I'm a fan of both games, this is jist a similarity ibe notived.....othe companies do the same, even Wyrds armies have gotten larger.....it just happens as the company groes.

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  4. I was secretly hoping the delay in hardcover was due to getting models released in line with them, for example updated crisis suits in October - Biel-tan getting plastic aspect warriors, Black Legion getting a new Abbadon sculpt, Saim-Hann getting new jet bikes etc...

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    1. There have been rumours to support that theory too. Pretty sure they were posted here as well...

      Is it just me who finds the whole printing backlog excuse ludicrous?

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    2. Yes, Kris, it's just you...

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    3. It's a fairly feasible reason and ties in with a few of the questions that were asked by the main GW chaps at the Citadel event; the main one being "Would you like to see more codices or supplements?"

      I figured that it was just for development as the same guys work on the books but I get the impression that the supps are done without a timeframe when their scheduled codex work is complete. After all there's no new models as yet for any supp books so the logistics of supporting those releases are greatly decreased. That question could well have extended to printing also, AFAIK GW do almost all of their production in-house and what with their obsession for preventing leaked info using an(other?) external printer would absolutely not be viable.

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  5. I hate the "it isn't a cash grab" arguments. That is strictly an opinion with no bearing in reality. If a company is selling a product, it is a cash grab. It is as simple as that. If they wanted to treat us as editors (which they already have), it should be released FREE digitally and offer the books for purchase after revisions are finished. The having to pay for our armies and rules 6 times is extremely unappealing, especially when these books are full of spelling errors, and out right rules errors.

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    1. ... and the "it is a cash grab" isn't an opinion with no bearing in reality?

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    2. Selling a product is a cash grab.

      It's this thing called a 'fact'. Unlike an opinion, or even an educated opinion, it is based on a simple truth.
      An undeniable one too. They release rules(books) because it makes them money.

      When being a smartass, it helps to think about what you are going to say, figure out if it is at all logical, and then self censor when it isn't. That way you are giving an educated opinion with some value. As opposed to your post...

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    3. @Kris: "Physician, heal thyself."

      :-D

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    4. Selling a product is not a "cash grab", it's providing the service of exchanging commodities based on their perceived value. They have models that we want, we have cash that they want. It's a voluntary (key word there) "exchange".

      A cash grab is like parking somewhere, getting hit by a private parking company and getting charged £60 for a ten minute stay when the value of the stay costs nothing like that and the charging is done under the false pretense of being an actual parking ticket. If you want to talk about a "bearing in reality" then get the perspective right. You don't HAVE to spend £90 on a Wraithknight or whatever, you can win without them. Codices are a different argument; they have more value than the models and shocker, they cost money because people have to be paid.

      The crux is the perceived value of an item. Yeah, a 'Knight is £90 which is like 1-3 nights out on the lash. Use it more than three times and it's already more economical than three nights out that a lot of people barely remember, ten times and it's cost £9 per game. Same with the books, only cheaper. This is a luxury hobby, not an essential entitlement that people need for free. GW produces arguably the finest gaming miniatures in the world and are a fairly small company for the scale on which they operate. Like most things, the value of their produces increases with their amount of use, for some people the prices are manageable and the game is worthwhile.

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  6. Battletech has had this issue for years ever since they started doing digital products. one thing they do however is make the physical copy avaliable for pre-order when the elctronic verison comes out you can also, get a package deal where you buy the digital copy while also placing a pre-order for the hard copy. (the PDF copy being at a slight discount) I'd not be at all suprised to see GW shift to this approuch themselves

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  7. Sigh...sad that the Farsight supplement hardcover isn't coming out until October. I want to play it in my local tourneys, but my FLGSs refuse to sanction any supplement unless the hardcover is available and in possession.

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  8. 32 dollars for an ebook or 18 dollars more for a hardcover Uhh. Are there other ebooks that sell for 70% of printed versions?

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    1. Actually, yes there are. Although for 70% of paperback prices and not hardback prices. We’ve got Steve Jobs to thank for that. Before iTunes, Amazon sold eBooks form the larger publishers for 9.99 USD regardless of the RRP (less known authors will sell for as low as 2.99). It is why you saw a release schedule of first hardbacks, than paperbacks and eBooks last, so that publishers could maximize their margins. Steve Jobs was concerned that 9.99 would become consumers’ future expected price point which didn’t provide sufficient profit for Apple. He therefore brokered a deal with all the major publishers for an agency contract. This would enable the publishers to set the price (at the mutually planned) price point of 12-15 USD. This increased the margin for both Apple and the publishers. Because all the publishers bought into this, they were able to force Amazon into an agent agreement as well. Since paperback (I believe) have a standard price 13-20 USD, this means the iBooks/eBooks get sold at approximately 70-100% of the retail price. It isn’t until the retail price drops that the eBook price drops. http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2011/08/class-action-suit-targets-apple-and-five-publishers-for-price-fixing/

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  9. I thought GW had all last year to get ready!

    Im not really buying this "printer backlog". These releases are planned out in advance. Again I say digital editions cut out many costly expenses like printing, shipping,selling, etc. It also allows GW to control the product.

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    1. The codices are planned out in advance, the supps are done on a when-it's-done basis after the main book is released. See my above comment on GW wanting to limit their 3rd-party printing.

      Not sure what you're getting at with the digital comment, because that's exactly what GW have done?

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    2. Not sure what you mean by limit their third party printing. All printed material is out sourced, look at the back it tells you printed in China.

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    3. Yes Mauler we all read your almost word for word quote of GW 's corporate explanation on prices.

      And I still say delaying the hard copy is intentional. AND I will also go as far as saying its a blatent CASH GRAB. The codexs are mostly regurgetated material any way and for $50.00 US dollars very thin both in terms of size and content. GW could have simply put the supplement info in the codex.

      And NO GW does not make THE BEST GAMING MINATURES, A noticable change from THE BEST TOY SOLDIERS!

      HALF OR MORE OF THERE PLASTIC KITS ARE 15 YEARS OLD. And while the detail is improving even Jes Goodwin noted that there molding capabilitys were limited.
      GW needs to update there molding machines from 25 years ago to the current state of the art injection molding machines. GW's not doing that is pure evidence of lack of desire to produce the best, and just sit back churn out old kits on dated machines that cost very little to make at a greatly inflated price.

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    4. Printed in China, doesn't mean that it's not a GW-owned team doing the printing. At a corporate level you generally can't just go "Cheng, we need you guys at Chinese Printers #2 to pick up the slack from these other guys" and just mail a PDF over to print. There's all kinds of contractual crap to hammer out along with security checks, SLAs, due dilligence and all sorts of red tape. I doubt it's a simple or cheap task to rope in another printer, not have any leaks and get the job done to their current standard *just* to get a supplement out three months prior.

      Unknown, you're welcome. I'm not arguing that it's not intentional, I'm saying that codices are higher up in GW's priority list (and rightly so) so if supps have to be delayed to get more important books out then I can see why.

      Like I said: "arguably the best gaming miniatures". There may be some PP models or whatever that are more detailed and/or versatile but are they produced on the volumes of scale that GW produce their items in-house? Of course not. And yes, it's all related; look at the Jesbikes - that test sculpt has been around for years and hasn't been put into production for the simple reason that other products are more important and so take priority. Models over a decade old will be refreshed when schedule, logistics & funds allow for it but completely new units will get models first.

      To be fair man, I get the impression that you're sitting there complaining that stuff isn't good enough when you seem to have absolutely zero idea about how a workflow in a corporate-level entity works. I didn't, either, until I worked within one. It's not a family-run business where the Top Guy can click fingers and two weeks later it's done, there's a fack-load of checks, approvals and stakeholding that goes into putting new designs into production so I imagine that it all has to be managed pretty strictly. It's not just GW, the corp I work for started deploying Windows 7 to our machines last year. We're not even 10% done on our site, not even 5%. Things take time when coin-counters pull the strings and not creative staff. I'm assuming that GW charge a premium for their products so that they can replace/upgrade their production facilities? Again, needs to be managed so that the down-time is minimised. Takes time.

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    5. GW had a team in china until 2010, but not now, only production in the UK and USA. So the china stuff is out sourced under what must be a strict NDA.

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  10. Who goes out drinking and pissing the night away 2, 3, or 4 times a week? And still has intrest in playing with little toy soldiers?

    Some things in life are NON OPTIONAL SOCIAL CONVENTIONS WITH IN ONES PEER GROUP.

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    1. People who can afford to. I know quite a few. And yes, I know, right? Like going out and getting hammered.

      The example still stands, the person doesn't need to go out on the lash AND play Warhammer, it's just the expenditure over time and the results that are relavant, my slightly trolly and fairly amusing chum.

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